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on top of a recessionary environment is a toxic mix. >> the ecb saying spanish bank deposits down 1.1% on the month in august, which means they're now the lowest level since april 2008. and we've got a prime minister there who has effectively said to the markets come out and short me because we're not going to go for a bailout unless webo costs go higher. and he's trying to delay aid until after the catalonia elections. and that seems like a pretty thin tight rope to walk. loan i. >> and we'll get the report on just how much money the banks need. it is suspected it will be in the 60 billion plus. but the elections on october 21st, that's rajoy's own province. and then you have the cat lo loaniloa loanian region think they're the richest region giving too much to the others. the rest of the region has seen a dramatic change. during the good times, they had revenue. from the developers, people buying properties, now that's all going and they're left from the legacy. from cat loan i can't to the canaries, you name it, all of these places, they're all struggling.alonia to the canari you
the regulatory environment will look like next year. they don't know what demand will look like next year. and so, because of these uncertainties as a result of the fiscal cliff and the fact that we haven't had any policies really coming out of congress and the white house to really fix this, it's all been monetary policy, the federal reserve has really been the only one out there, the only game in town to really provide stimulus for this economy. we don't have an energy policy. we haven't had a budget in three years. as a result, businesses are waiting to see what happens in this election, and they're waiting to see what their lives will look like tax rates, regulation, etc., they're upset about the healthcare expense, so they're waiting until after the election to really decide if, in fact, they will hire new workers and put new money to work. i think we really are in standstill right now. host: here's the headline, "wall street braces for an obama win." mitt romney was wall street street's candidate, a former private equity executive, committed to lower taxes and less regulation, who would nev
. >> farmers fear that as a byproduct of the mining, toxic chemicals will be released into the environment and wind up in the food chain. >> conducting chemical analysis will not help me if there is poisonous stuff flying around in the air. or finding its way into the groundwater. >> there is a tradition of mining in the area. 2000 years ago, the romans mind for goals here. it is thought to have one of the biggest gold deposits in western europe. mining here is lucrative, even if the excavation is costly environmental regulations strict. the people are divided on the issue. some residents are banding together to raise support for the mine. the mother of this young family is one of them. like 40% of the population, she is out of work. >> i hope that thanks to the mine, we will be able to stay and our family will have a future here. otherwise, we will have to move away. >> but where to? the effects of the economic crisis are being felt across spain. in this region, there is little industry outside of traditional coal mining, and its days are numbered. the regional government could sorely use
. melissa: harry dent. always great. thank you. >>> fracking our way to a healthier environment? environmentalist says fracking boom is the cause of lowest carbon dioxide emissions in 20 years. he is here next to explain. fascinating stuff. >>> dire situation for many states. state workers are still making more money than people in the private sector. we have details from a revealing new report. more "money" coming up. ♪ . rachel quit the corporate grind to start her own interior design business. she's got a growing list of clients she keeps in touch with using e-mail marketing from constantcontact.com. constantcontact is easy and affordable. it lets her send out updates and photos that showcase her expertise and inspire her customers for only $15 a month. [ dog barking ] her dream -- to be the area's hottest interior design office. [ children laughing ] right now, she just dreams of an office. get a free trial at constantcontact.com. ♪ . melissa: so the summer heat may be dying down but the debate on tracking is heating up. environmentalist calls it by far the decade's best
where you can find opportunity. >> everybody's looking for yield in an environment where we can't find any. rick, what are you seeing there today? >> you had a great point. everybody's looking for yields, so everybody needs to take more risk. that's the plan. the problem is, when you take more risk to get more reward, you have more risk. you know, take the word austerity and throw it out. use the word reform. one guest just said central bankers are doing all the heavy lifting. because the heavy lifting for them is easy. print, print, print, print. the real hard part is the reform the politicians need to get these economies vibrant. it's not going to be easy. that's why it looks like it's gridlock. it looks like it's fighting. in the end, it's because there isn't one easy magic wand solution. >> sure, sure. you could call it reform, michelle. you could call it austerity. you can call it cup cakes. i don't know what you want to call t but it hurts. >> the difference matters, right? here's what we found in greece. they don't want to do reforms. they don't want to break the companies in co
, if anything, a deflationary environment right now, the inflation hedge, the inflation premium that you get from gold is going down. is that why the price is down? >> yeah. that's not going to last. um, you know, let's think about what's going on right now. we've got europe possibly falling apart, and we've got -- and the euro barely moving on that news. and you've got ben bernanke printing money. you know, i don't think that -- i think we got a little frothy on some of these commodity prices. look for them to form a bottom here and to start getting a bid. i think gold is going to start rallying here shortly along with soy, wheat and probably beef and pork. david: i tend to agree with you on gold anyway because the cb doesn't seem to be slowing down, and whether we like it or not, the fed's going to be printing money -- >> right. >> as long as we're getting free money from bernanke, i like to joke, gold's going to rally. i'm looking for $1800 an ounce relatively soon. but, you know, i think the real interesting thing is the s&p. we've got spain falling apart, and secession talk, and we've o
in their preparation. they are the first to bear the negative consequences in growth and trade and environment, as well as on the social fabric of society. as a result of unfair trade rules and conditionality is composed -- in post. - imposed. there is a need for a new, local, economic government. i say there is an urgent need for a new global economic government, centered on people and aiming at consolidating cooperation between partners and development on the basis of mutual benefit and interest. mr. president? , i have laid before you our position, a vision shared by the egyptian people. i have also attempted to briefly outline egyptian views on the main issues, the divisions of the young and children, the women and the men in egypt, on all important questions in the middle east and the rest of the world. i am sure that the united nations is capable of addressing all global and regional challenges through dialogue and joined corporations in accordance with the principles of international law. egypt will spare no effort in dealing sincerely with all the members of this organization. we will always re
there are byproducts. one is low kreeyields. >> regulators keep saying because of the low yield environment, buy more bonds because they now have a pension deficit. that's nonsense, of course. what's happening on the corporate side? they're awash with capital. are we also getting less issuance and how much more money do corporates need to have? >> what's interesting is the eurozone credit market is shrinking year on year which is the first time it's done that for a long time. there's not only less issuance, there's less coming out to meet, retiring effectively. corporates as kelly said earlier, the economic outlook is not rosy. the motivation to carry out m&a activities is relatively low. so i expect the trend to continue. >> and the quality they're issuing isn't all that great either. >> the good quality have all the cash they need. so, you know, they don't need any who are. >> most of them have the cash. i think the good quality borrowers can borrow really easier. there's huge 2k3457demand for h the spreads are tight. >> angela merkel and mario draghi are both delivering speeches in berlin today. o
was confusing for several years. in the end, he chose to change the environment around him, not to change himself. when he entered high school, takamasa made clear his hope of attending as a boy. the school accepted him, a first for the institution. >> translator: takamasa insisted early on that he wanted to come out, so we accepted it and tried to support him as best we can. >> reporter: takamasa's schoolmates have overcome the initial shock and accept him. >> translator: i don't care if he's a boy or a girl. takamasa his own person. >> translator: i'm his friend because takamasa is takamasa. we enjoy boy to boy talk. >> reporter: as some schools open up, the attitudes of medical practitioners are also starting to change. the number of youngsters visiting medical institutions for gid is increasing. so the age of hormone therapy has been lowered from 18 to 15. as a result, 17-year-old takamasa is eligible for treatment. >> translator: since my voice became deeper, i feel i'm starting to become the real me. i'm becoming more outgoing. >> reporter: takamasa has decided to come out and talk
the toyota prius as a simple but important way to make the commitment to the environment. now, let's visit another one of california's golden parks. hello, everybody. i'm huell howser, and here we are in the sierra nevada mountains in northern california. we're near the community of truckee. we e
of the environment ministry. this means politicians and bureaucrats will still have influence because they control the agency's budget. and that issue is a composition of the nra's task. more than 80% of its employees come from previous regulatory bodies. to prevent conflicts of interest, the government says nra employees will be prohibited from moving or returning to the ministry of industry. the government unit that promoted nuclear energy that critics are already finding loopholes in this. >> what challenges will the nra be facing over the coming months? >> there's a long list. without doubt, the most important and immediate challenge is redefining nuclear safety regulations. new standards will have to take into account the latest findings and technological advances to make sure nuclear plants can withstand natural disasters and major accidents. once the nra sets its standards, it will conduct a case-by-case review of all of japan's nuclear reactors to determine which can be brought back online. the nra plans to come up with new criteria by july of next year. one concern experts must address is
the environment. i had to put some color into it. i have to put some interesting prints into it. >> he brought fashion sensibility to the beach. the clothing brent became a hit as residents -- when it started. today it has 10 shops. the slogan, brazilian flavor. >> this is my favorite right now. i am in love with the sport. >> his apartment has the same casual style. he traveled to indonesia for surfing and began selling them to chain stores. >> i was designing some interesting prince and they would not buy them. they always wanted the little fish are the coconut tree or the sun. it became boring to me. they only chose conservative prince. i think that maybe i should try to start my own brand. so i opened my first store. rio is such an interesting culture. we do not have to hire marketing directors or agencies to see what is the new trend in what is going to happen. all you have to do is drw on your own experience in city. >> when you confined more on that story on our web site and the top news of the day, from us here in sao paulo, thank for watching this edition of "bbc world new america" li
? >> not really. the nra is now under the umbrella of the environment ministry. this means politicians and bureaucrats will still have influence because they control the agency's budget. another issue is a composition of the nra's task. more than 80% of its employees come from previous regulatory bodies. to prevent conflictsf interest, the government says nra employees will be prohibited from moving or returning to the ministry of industry. the government unit that promoted nuclear energy, but critics are already finding loopholes in this. >> what challenges will the nra be facing over the coming months? >> there's a long list. without doubt, the most important and immediate challenge is redefining nuclear safety regulations. new standards will have to take into account the latest findings and technological advances to make sure nuclear plants can withstand natural disasters and major accidents. once the nra sets its standards, it will conduct a case-by-case review of all of japan's nuclear reactors to determine which can be brought back online. the nra plans to come up with new criter
to stimulate cargo. the cargo has to be there from the manufacturers and from the general economic environment. but next year, the car go industry might pick up a little bit. the conditions for cargo are still very bad now. but again, overall the industry of course is still more passenger than cargo. and it's been a bit of a double whammy this year because for the long call carriers operating out of asia, they're heavily exposed to markets like europe where there's been an impact. >> are we going get anymore meaningful consolidation? i don't see eus saying to america you should really allow for proper mergers between european and u.s. airlines. do you think that's ever going it to be allowed? >> there's still a lot of steps to be taken to allow that to happen. true global consolidation, a lot of countries still have policies that limit foreign investment in the airline sector. so we need to see a lot of changes in the regulatory environment to allow that to happen. in the meantime, we did see a lot of consolidation continue to happen within regions like latin america, like north america, like
and retail business are rising. and also in some lines of the industrial business. so the overall environment for the insurance industry is very good. your free float is about 20%. will you stop here for a while or will you raise money in the future? >> we'll raise money in the future, however, not for the next 24 months. we are sufficiently capitalized now after this ipo on for the next 24 months, but there will be further capital increases in the future. this is just our first step in to becoming a listed insurance company. >> all right. and just give us your view where we stand at the moment with the world economy. because it's interesting where you're looking at your operations. eurozone still in the grips of recession or low growth, weaker growth in asia. just give us your sense of how you view the world and how it transfers back into your business. >> i'm 100% sure that the euro will survive. the euro is instrumental for the future of europe. the emerging market particularly in brazil and mexico are very interesting growing markets for the future. and also the middle and eastern europea
to the environment. carbos products rely heavily on fossil fuels. one researcher says the new project is a step up in scale. >> normally we are in our labs doing in test tube size scales. occasionally, we might use a 100 leader reactor. this time, the goal is to go big, tons, a cubic meters. >> the pilot plant is just one of many looking to shake up the industry. the bio economy association consists of 80 industry leaders. they players -- big players like chemical producers, to them, the association is an investment in the future. >> the future of the industry is green. everyone talks about sustainability. we walk the walk and frankly we have no other choice. the oil wells will not float forever. >> oil refineries still loom larger, but the winds are changing. >> not to an update from somalia where african union and somali troops have consolidated their grip on a city there. >> the southern port was the last urban stronghold of the islamist militia which made what it called a tactical retreat over the weekend. the al qaeda-linked militants were driven out of the capital last year and continue to c
chemistry of the ancient water streams. then we'll tell them what the environment was like on mars billions of years ago. jonathan amos, "bbc news." >> also interesting to know what was out there once. stay with us on "bbc world news." there's plenty more to come. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/international news. funding for this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and help provide capital for key decisions. we offer expertise and tailored in a wide raping of industries. what can we do for you? >> "bbc world news" was presen
efficiency and, with exciting, great new- product of the time. of course the environment sometimes presents you with more tail winds that had winds. altogether, the economies have become more volatile. so flexibility is the name of the game. we do believe that we are very well positions in this thing that generally the premium manufacturers have a more supportive business model to succeed in the future than the volume manufacturers. >> i should quickly add one of the big problems for the car makers as well in east china. it was a market they are relying on it. china is now slowing, which means they will have to make tough decisions in cost-cutting and job cuts. >> thank you very much. the chinese dissident artist ai weiwei has lost his final appeal in a tax evasion fight that he says as politically motivated. the artists will have to pay $2.4 million following a ruling by an appeals court. from beijing, martin patients report. >> ai weiwei said this was a case he never believed he could win. during the entire legal process, he did not see the evidence against him. after the final appeal he
operations are safe and clean for our communities and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> typhoon jelawat continues to roar in the far east. more than 50 people have been hurt. hundreds of thousands of homes without power on japan's islands of okinawa. the storm is comparable to a category 3 hurricane. we have report this morning of two opposition leaders killed in venezuela. the pair was stopped in a western state saturday. when they exited their vehicle, gunmen opened fire. opposition party candidates will face prison hugo chavez in elections one week from today. >>> protesters battled with riot police in spain saturday night. the austerity measures were imposed to help spain secure loans and reduce debt. unemployment in the nation is close to 25%. >>> today iraq, a series of bombings has left at least 16 people dead. thmajority of the blasts occurring in and around the city of baghdad. five explosions there and a car bombing at a check point that killed three iraqi police officers. >>> to syria now where rebel and government forces e fighting it out block by block.
so they have been using their cards a little more. and paying it off. that is the environment we are in. nolast but not least, may deal with paypal, so that will add to their future transactions. for today a great day. ashley: ashley:.i. talking to john mccain about the biggest headwind facing the usa today. liz: can you imagine voting for this interview. wait until you listen come back here what he had to say. not just how we get rid of tax abductions, but all of them except two. but also which industries are mature enough that we should rip the rug out from underneath them and stop giving him all kinds of tax breaks. speaking very candidly with me. i first asked about different kinds of government strategies where government works best with this, here' here is what senator mccain had to say. >> you're picking winners and losers, and obvious in the case of solyndra and many others, we have picked losers. but there are so many technologies that have been developed is gps, the internet, but that is a research and development area handed over from the private sector. that is where
says an employer has to provide a safe working environment, and if they don't provide a safe working environment -- which is really what the refs are there to do first and foremost, to keep the players safe -- then that union is empowered to watch over the resolution of that problem. and so far the coaches' and players' unions have held their tongues and not gotten involve with the this ref dispute. cheryl: you know, if you look at the amount of bets that were lost, especially on the packers' game, we're talking $150 million, granted some booking agencies are actually refunding because they say, look, the proof is what you saw on television. at the same time, though, do you this think that this is going to make the owners look bad because they're the ones that have so much of a financial stake in all this, they're the ones that are losing if their team loses based on a bad call? >> yeah. i think what're seeing now -- what we're seeing now is some tension among the owners because they realize they're damaging the nfl brand, and it's a brand that's been respected. it's roger goodell's
and solutions. and again with the complicated regional and international environment, we have to be very, very careful. we are drawing down of two wars in the middle east, in iraq and afghanistan than many would say at the very least in terms of success and some would characterize as failures, especially into the future. so they have to be very, very careful about interjecting our source. frankly perhaps ultimately if this uprising unworn syria basically can be contained. there needs to be a syrian solution to this. as i said earlier, many of the syrian opposition are as pro-u.s. anyone else's career. we have to be careful about these things. and i think we just can't throw our weight around. as much as we would like to. as much as there seems to be a moral imperative to do so, we don't understand the landscape. we are getting a better idea, but the opposition is so decentralized. there is no coherent group, you know, we could support that we be as i said earlier shooting in the dark to some degree. you know, what would happen in terms of the worst across borders or hezbollah. why would russia
business decisions being made as a result of the uncertainty in the macro environment. >> the dow up 10%. the s&p 500 up nearly 500. nasdaq up nearly 20%. the dax up 25. pretty nice gains. at the beginning of the year, you would have taken all of those for the year, right? >> certainly. the reason being, actually stocks and corporates are generally in this economic crisis that we're seeing around the western world are the safe haven. you don't want exposure to governments. you don't want exposure to consumers. the corporates can manage their cost base. they can move where the demand is much more freely than say consumers can and governments can. so at the moment, money's got to go somewhere and it's hard to get too bearish on equities, given the yields and actually how demand is holding up for these organizations. >> that's what you were talking about, where else that money might go. so look, for example, at corporate credit where we've seen such an inflow into high yield. we've seen high yield returning in the range of 17% this year. so if you look into next year when it already looks
what moody's does in this environment, where actually we're discussing whether there will be intervention on the ecb? >> first of all, i think it is very relevant because this would bring spain's rating down to junk levels, which is the lowest of all three rating agencies, so it's a pretty big deal. and then the ecb program can't be implemented until spain actually says they want help. so it depends what happens first. i think it's going to be a slippery slope. finally, we've got the budget coming up tomorrow. there are more painful cuts, it could mean more pain for spain and more pain for the euro. >> there's a lot of tifs in tha. >> you could also argue that all the central banks have been ineffective in generating momentum in the markets right now. so even if they're persistently buying, it's really about risk appetite and sentiment. i don't think there's enough there. central banks could come in and make another announcement, but i think having just made these unprecedented announcements, that that could lead to firefighting. >> what are you targeting? >> lo
producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. >>> welcome back. we have weakness on wall street today. about 30 minutes left before the closing bell sounds. the dow jones industrial average down about 38 points in the home stretch. more from mary thompson. >> just about seven points above the lows of the day for the dow jones industrial average, pressured by europe. we want to highlight one group. you heard seema talking about some of the bounce back and the big tech names earlier today. the tech sector was the weakest performer among the ten we follow. energy right now has taken that slot. turning around in large part because we've seen a turn around in hewlett-packard. they've come off
. so there is -- it's a very skittish, very fragile environment. >> yeah. obviously, the q2 gdp numbers are old, a little dusty here, but they do not show any acceleration which is what we're trying to find clues to in the back half of the of the year. >> i think what happened is europe had a much bigger effect on business sentiment than many people thought. it's been dampening exports and capital spending which is what the durables reflect. as we moved through the summer and stabilized on europe, normally we might get some acceleration. the problem frou is you have the fiscal cliff and the election. people now have yet another excuse not to do anything. had europe not bled into the summer as long as it did, maybe you'd have gotten that spark in activity. but right now you just don't have it. >> are you taking a lot of solace in what housing's done, what confidence is doing? >> yeah, the housing numbers i think are great. that's one of the reasons the economy hasn't been strong to this point in the cycle. housing is keeping us from really stuttering on growth. we need more in housing, a
in this environment. how do you do it when we see the fundamentals are not keeping up with some of this market performance? >> it's a real challenge. the private client was tremendously traumatized by the financial crisis and spooked by technology glitches and continuing scandals in the marketplace. they still don't trust that if they put their money in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, it's going to grow in value over time. we've been encouraging them in as many ways as we can to move out of cash, move out of bonds, which they perceive as safe but have their own risks, into at least a benchmark waiting in equities. the problem is all through this year you've had overhanging uncertainty in the marketplace. first, u.s. economic growth, china, european sovereign debt crisis. those have been replaced right now by, as you've mentioned, fiscal cliff and debt ceiling negotiations. the investor is confused about where to go, but those investors who stayed in cash missed this rally that we've had this year. they shouldn't make that mistake again. >> are you saying don't stay in cash? you want to get on thi
lockheed's f-35 program most at risk. goldman sachs says the current downsizing environment increases the potential for m & a activity. with the clock ticking down to fiscal armageddon, expect defense companies to send out layoffs after the holiday. that's your q-4 channel check for defense. i'm jane wells. >> all right. so let's dig deeper into which defense stocks could feel the biggest impacts if we go off the fiscal cliff. >> joining us is jeremy devaney. do you think we'll see those sequestration cuts in defense next year, $55 billion? >> good afternoon, bill. thanks for having me on. yes, we definitely think the fiscal cliff is coming, especially the sequestration cuts or the budget cuts for the defense department. right now the polarization up on the hill is not allowing for any movement in legislation to resolve that issue. >> all right. so let's talk about sort of breaking this down. first off, when are you expecting the defense companies to alert employees that their jobs will be cut? is that october 1st or november 2nd? what's your end date? >> sure. we're looking at novemb
are taking risks. >> oh, sure, in this environment, i mean, you know, we're watching liquidity like a hawk because there's great sense tomorrow morning it could go the other way, in effect you don't invest as much, you don't take as much risk. >> how would you counter the argument that businesspeople and the wealthy have had their way for the past 2030-years as they've increased their lead in terms of income disparity and gotten richer and richer, and you would have hoped that some of that would have trickled down, if it works you would have hoped the average person would have participated in the good times and haven't and you need a president that is going to come in for the powerless people that aren't able to set policy and pay to go do things and you need someone that will represent them in the future. how was is that pretty damned good? >> yes, sir. >> you can take this. thank you for writing it for me. >> i'll get you a job at "the new york times." the reality is as follows. the whole focus has been on how the quote, one percenters or ten percenters, how the top earners moved ahead o
is slowing. a lot of people say, look, what they're really doing is saying even in this environment we're going to make far more money than we have in the previous downturns if we get it at $6 in earnings, which is well below what they think they can earn. we'll still pay the dividend. i come back and say the acquisition, which they made and a lot of people were critical of, is working. that the synergies are working. that the costs taken out in regards to manufacturing, look, the world is slowing but it is not a disaster. that's why caterpillar is not at 885. >> do you lump this with the warnings from intel and fedex. it is a global company looking at a slowing global company. >> there isn't anything specifically i saw in the cat release that was saying we are not getting it right. this caterpillar is ready for a downturn unlike any other caterpillar we have had. a lot of times caterpillar had terrific numbers in the presentation about how low earnings have been in the slowdown. the headlines for this story, i'm sure he's at home saying, that's not what i said. i did not say things we
to fatal work injuries -- these are bls figures. exposure to harmful substances or environment. 9% of injuries have fatal work injuries due to what the caller was talking about guest: -- talking about. guest: that is right. although it, these aren't just injuries. -- these are just injuries. the we do not look at illnesses. host: so that would not be included. guest: that would not be included. and and lives will have a long latency period typically, so we're looking at a key events. -- acute events. the things you see on this chart are things that happen immediately. it is some kind of violence or fall or contact with equipment. host: exposure to harmful substance would be a one time event? could that include a berndt? guest: it could. we have fires and explosions. a burn would more likely fall into that category. host: when you see the commercials for asbestos and our practice, etc., with asbestos exposure -- exposure be included in the bls statistics? guest: generally not. that will be a latency issue. we only look at immediate injuries. we're looking at something over a short
market, the environment, a bunch of things very uneven, and gas price that is have been higher, and take the scarce income away from consumers, and the nagging concerns about other things, about the elections, and what happens with tax policy and europe. and jobs and a little bit about gas. >> tell us a little bit about the elections. >> d do you think that people will feel better just knowing who's going to be in the white house, and then go ahead with financial decisions they were going to be making and buy whatever purchases they were thinking about. >> we hope it's going to work out like that. >> when they win, we don't know the congress they're going to work with. we don't know if it's something they can put their heads together and work with or the parties will be at logger heads. >> it will be organic. we have to see who is elected and the demeanor between the president and the congress he has to work with. >> susie: and you know we hear so much from the federal reserve about how much super low interest rats are going to help the economy. to what extent are the low rates motivatin
uniforms but plenty of guns, a potential danger for u.s. troops. >> f you come to an environment like this there are afghans with weapons. >> they're not going to put away their weapons because we're here. as you see, everybody else has got theirs, too. >> reporter: you've built this relationship on trust and you're saying well, hold on, maybe we don't trust you and -- that's not what you're saying. >> right. >> reporter: but that's the impression. >> that may be the message. we tried to soft than blow as much as we can. they felt guilty for the incidents themselves so they understood why we were trying to do this. we're going to continue this relationship as best we can given this and they were good with it. >> reporter: the soldiers that we were with hoped to finish vetting the afghan forces this week but, scott, commanders have a new list of conditions that have to be met before their joint operations can start again and we're told the clock would be reset if there's a new insider attack. >> pelley: hard work to do in afghanistan. charlie thanks very much. the mystery of the loose
a little risk on in the short term, but european markets underperforming the u.s. >> in this environment, i'm a reluctant supporter of kuwaequi. you look at what we have, where bond yields are, where credit has gone over the course of the last six, eight months, you have to end up saying equities are the best of a band bunch. >> an improvement in the pace of job let claim filings. so just how much momentum is the world's juggernaut economy carrying into the fourth quarter? drew mattes joins us in studio. thanks for coming by. what is your view on the u.s. economy, how much momentum really is there as we look into the fourth quarter and next year? >> you're looking at growth in the fourth quarter probably not going to breach 2%. we're just going to have to learn to live with that. and as much as the job rest claims numbers are good news, we still haven't seen the pick up in hiring. so until we see that, i don't think you can get that much momentum. sdl they 00 a discussion about stall speed. are we headed in to recession or do we expect to slug it out here? >> what we found is the volatility
with a diverse group of needs. what is it you offer? an easy regulatory environment? educated workforce? low tax rate? what is your main draw? >> to be successful you have to do it all and we are focusing on all those things. we built on technology. texas instruments was one of the founding fathers and when you build a city on technology that happens. when we have the f.w. airport when you get any place in the nation very quickly the third busiest airport in the world, it helps a lot and city hall we make sure we get things in and out and make decisions and don't get caught up in a lot of bureaucracy. try to minimize that as much as we can. melissa: some things to highlight. you have a budget surplus of $2.3 million and that has to do with property tax base because home values did not go down -- go up or down as much. they have been stable. over the next five years you see 12.8% job growth ranking number 4 nationally. the biggest category you are going to add 127,000 professional and business service jobs. who should come to dallas looking to find a job? >> at at&t, move from san antonio and att
natural gas producers to supply affordable, cleaner energy, while protecting our environment. across america, these technologies protect air - by monitoring air quality and reducing emissions... ...protect water - through conservation and self-contained recycling systems... ... and protect land - by reducing our footprint and respecting wildlife. america's natural gas... domestic, abundant, clean energy to power our lives... that's smarter power today. that leads back from the exchange and she has a spicy loser for us. nicole: we are looking at jacoby mexican grill? we have seen this stock off sharply today. david einhorn reiterated his discontent with green mountain coffee. we talked a lot about that. he is doing that -- a couple reasons. talking about rising food prices and reasons to short according to david einhorn. rising food prices increase the employee health costs and last but not least the point he made is in a conference today talking about competition from taco bell. these are the reasons at this time and why we are seeing the stock up 6%. dow and the s&p with down arrows
and the environment. we're america's natural gas. >>> you're not going to find the characters in j.k. rowling's waving new magic wands. the big question is, can she match the magic of her best-selling kids series. erin mclaughlin is in london to find out. are people buying the books? >> reporter: so czar, as you can see behind me in west london it's been a pretty relatively calm day here despite the fact that this book has sold very well, has sold very well online. it's been a bestseller already in pre sales. but in terms of today, it seems to be a steady trickle of people through the store to buy the bo book. after all, we haven't seen the hallmarks of a harry potter launch. i haven't seen anyone dressed up in a wizard's costume. this isn't designed for a wizard's audience. this is, as you mentioned, a very adult book. as j.k. rowling described on abc's good morning america contains very adult themes. let's have a listen. >> there's adolescent sex. >> yes. >> there's cutting. >> yes. >> there's death. >> yes. but it's a comedy. there are all those things. when i read the blurb that said it's a black
candidate sort of feel the words and the environment before you really put them to the test. part is about building confidence and helping someone work their way into their stride. so i think typically yes you're running through those questions and then you're kind of up on your feet. and then you go from there. you rework the questions. you see how you're presenting piece by piece. it all comes together. >> jennifer: how important is this debate prep for president obama because romney has been debating a lot this year. just real quickly. >> i think it's very important. this is the highest influxion moment of any campaign, particularly a presidential campaign. and so he's pretty good on his feet but again every answer is a minute and a half. you have to be hone and sharp and get your few points across that will then be covered by the media and form the broader public's opinion of what happened. >> jennifer: exactly. so interesting. i'll be watching. great popcorn moment. that's democratic strategist jill alpe
media matters less. they have less of a control of the environment. a lot of people are writing it off. sometimes breath-taking to see. >> i don't know if msnbc fits my description of main stream media but a contradiction of what you said. you said they have a smaller audience which is true but on the other hand the bias might affect the campaign. if the audience for the main stream media smaller, the network and big newspapers presumably it's having less impact on public opinion. >> it is also controlling where the campaign goes. and the climate it creates. >> bret: put up polls, number five. news organization spending more time defending president obama and attacking romney 47%. romney attacking obama 16%. 21% on the next one, focusing on the presidential candidates or the news coverage, silly, serious issues. there you see the split. the news coverage silly issues dominating. charles, you thoughts? >> the role of the media is auxiliary of the obama campaign and they should relocate to chicago and save travel time. if you look at the specific issues and how they're covered, for examp
and continues to be a very challenging environment. speak of the reason there is no defeat of al qaeda and in afghanistan is because the administration even the last two years of the previous administration not interested in working with civil society to work with the younger generati generation, and unfortunately we are going to withdraw and the taliban will come back and sees as much as they can. ashley: the arab spring, what challenges does it pose with regards to security in the region? >> lebanon is clearly a lost cause, and the israelis are watching. iraq is going the wrong direction, the president has no solution to what is going on with iran contaminating the entire region. we have a policy that is absolutely bankrupt, it is going to lead to far broader problems across that part of the world and also the underbelly of europe. he think we have had it bad, this rate it will get much worse. ashley: all right, thank you so much. they will have much more on the administration's response to libya and afghanistan later coming up with the "a-team." no more bailouts, national debt is ov
to the environment to taxation. elected state officials and corporate representatives close the door to press and public and to gather, approved the bills that will be sent out to america. americans have no idea they come from alec unless someone l exposes it. >> when i went to the alec convention last august, i remember going to a workshop and hearing a little bit about a bill they did in florida and some other states. there is a proposal to provide special need scholarships. i come back to wisconsin and what gets introduced was to write get ready. i know you have a shocked look. a bill to do just that. >> 26 alec members in wisconsin legislators sponsored the special needs bill, but the real sponsor was alec. the bill bore a striking resemblance to alec's model. have a look. >> he is not concerned that only alec's since bills into the state legislature. >> some of the legislation sounds so immaculate. when you read about why they're doing it, and another is a far different reason why something is coming forth and that is important the average person and, if they knew that a bill like this f
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